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Tropheus Tanks & Equipment Discussion of tanks, filters, heaters, lighting, UV and other equipment.

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  #1  
Old 01-24-2008
spartan
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I am kind of new to this. I have had cichlids in the past (a while back).

Can anyone recommend a setup (filters, heaters, lights, etc) that would have everythign I need to have a colony of tropheus?

I am looking for something nice to put in the den but I do not want to go to the pet stores and get ripped off.

Any help would be appreciated.
I am from the Detroit area if there are any reputable places anyone can recommend.

Thanks
MIKE


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  #2  
Old 01-25-2008
Heather
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Welcome aboard Mike

There are all kinds of combos you can use on that tank
On my 75g, I run a fluval 404 and an XP3 :icon_cheers:
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Old 01-25-2008
Tetratec
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As far as lighting, heaters, If you in the past have had Africans{Malawi's} every thing could still be used there isn't a big difference that way.



Wayne
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  #4  
Old 01-25-2008
spartan
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Heather @ Jan 25 2008, 08:48 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Quote:
Welcome aboard Mike

There are all kinds of combos you can use on that tank
On my 75g, I run a fluval 404 and an XP3 :icon_cheers:[/b]

Thanks for the information. Is the 404 Sufficient for a 90 gallon?
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Old 01-25-2008
bassin
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if you plan on keeping Tropheus here is what i use on my 75gal kachese tank i have an aquaclear 110 and a fluval 304 and just for added water movement a penguin power head i also do a 40-50% water change every 7 days i have a total of 32 fish in the tank. Just my 2 cents. :icon_cheers:
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  #6  
Old 01-25-2008
ValleyAquatics
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Welcome to the forum......good advice has already been given.
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  #7  
Old 01-30-2008
spartan
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Thanks for all the input.
So regardless of if I get a 75 or a 90 gallon I have a few more questions.
If I get a fluval 405, a sufficient size heater (I was thinking visi stealth), some crushed coral or somthing like that for the bottom, what else would I need?

Would the tank need to be drilled for the wet/dry? What exactly do people drill the tank for? Just a cleaner look for the filtration plumbing?

What is the advantage of a sump? Does the wet/dry take it's place?

What exactly is an overflow??

What type of lighting do the trophs need and like?

Sorry for the dumb questions.....they may seem elementary, but since I have had a tank (as a kid) things have progressed a lot


Thanks for any help ahead of time
MIKE
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Old 01-30-2008
Gerry
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Spartan @ Jan 30 2008, 05:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Quote:
Thanks for all the input.
So regardless of if I get a 75 or a 90 gallon I have a few more questions.
If I get a fluval 405, a sufficient size heater (I was thinking visi stealth), some crushed coral or somthing like that for the bottom, what else would I need?

Honestly? Another filter if you can afford it. 2 filters allow you to clean one very thoroughly while leaving the other to take care of bio-filtration. The cleaning can be alternated and that way, your fish are never at risk. Tropheus also like a high flow in the tank.

I would personally go with sand although crushed coral is better for adding some hardness to the water. The crushed coral will be harder on their mouths than sand as Tropheus tend to sift the substrate a lot. Sand is also considerably cheaper at about 5 bucks for 50 pounds.


Would the tank need to be drilled for the wet/dry? What exactly do people drill the tank for? Just a cleaner look for the filtration plumbing?

Tanks only need to be drilled for wet/dry filters or sumps where the water is being drawn directly from the tank.

What is the advantage of a sump? Does the wet/dry take it's place?

A sump was originally a wet/dry filter that was eventually considered not the ideal filter for salt water tanks because the media traps mulm and adds to the nitrate count. Salties converted their wet/dry filters into sumps by removing the bio-media, meaning all they did was hold water and other items like skimmers, heaters, probes and such.

A wet/dry is a filter and you can either drill your tank to facilitate the transfer of large volumes of water very quickly or you can use a HOB overflow that accomplishes the same thing as drilling, except that they are typically a little slower and less reliable in the case of a power outage. Wet/dry filters can handle large volumes of water and are relatively maintenance-free. Water "trickles" (wet/dry filters were originally known as trickle filters) through the bio-media where the nitrifying bacteria are essentially suspended in damp air and clean the water of ammonia and nitrites. This is the most efficient manner since the bacteira have all the oxygen they need, as compared ot being submerged in water.

Both systems add a certain volume of water to the tank, making the water a little more stable.

What exactly is an overflow??

A means by which the water from the aqaurium is transfered from the tank to the wet/dry or sump by way of gravity. There is a pump in the sump/wet/dry that returns the water to the tank. The water "overflows" by virtue of the tank being filled by the pump. There will be a continous flow of water from the tank to the wet/dry and back to the tank.

What type of lighting do the trophs need and like?

Lighting is for our eyes and in some cases for the growth of algae. The fish themselves would be fine with ambient light. You can go with almost any kind of lighting, from cheap fluorescent strip lighting to metal halide lights intended for reefs. Typically, the better lighting, the more you pay.

Sorry for the dumb questions.....they may seem elementary, but since I have had a tank (as a kid) things have progressed a lot

No such thing as a dumb question. Every one has to start somewhere and you've asked some very good questions. I'm impressed.


Thanks for any help ahead of time

You're welcome!

MIKE[/b]
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  #9  
Old 01-30-2008
spartan
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Gerry @ Jan 30 2008, 07:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Quote:
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Spartan @ Jan 30 2008, 05:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Quote:
Thanks for all the input.
So regardless of if I get a 75 or a 90 gallon I have a few more questions.
If I get a fluval 405, a sufficient size heater (I was thinking visi stealth), some crushed coral or somthing like that for the bottom, what else would I need?

Honestly? Another filter if you can afford it. 2 filters allow you to clean one very thoroughly while leaving the other to take care of bio-filtration. The cleaning can be alternated and that way, your fish are never at risk. Tropheus also like a high flow in the tank.

I would personally go with sand although crushed coral is better for adding some hardness to the water. The crushed coral will be harder on their mouths than sand as Tropheus tend to sift the substrate a lot. Sand is also considerably cheaper at about 5 bucks for 50 pounds.


Would the tank need to be drilled for the wet/dry? What exactly do people drill the tank for? Just a cleaner look for the filtration plumbing?

Tanks only need to be drilled for wet/dry filters or sumps where the water is being drawn directly from the tank.

What is the advantage of a sump? Does the wet/dry take it's place?

A sump was originally a wet/dry filter that was eventually considered not the ideal filter for salt water tanks because the media traps mulm and adds to the nitrate count. Salties converted their wet/dry filters into sumps by removing the bio-media, meaning all they did was hold water and other items like skimmers, heaters, probes and such.

A wet/dry is a filter and you can either drill your tank to facilitate the transfer of large volumes of water very quickly or you can use a HOB overflow that accomplishes the same thing as drilling, except that they are typically a little slower and less reliable in the case of a power outage. Wet/dry filters can handle large volumes of water and are relatively maintenance-free. Water "trickles" (wet/dry filters were originally known as trickle filters) through the bio-media where the nitrifying bacteria are essentially suspended in damp air and clean the water of ammonia and nitrites. This is the most efficient manner since the bacteira have all the oxygen they need, as compared ot being submerged in water.

Both systems add a certain volume of water to the tank, making the water a little more stable.

What exactly is an overflow??

A means by which the water from the aqaurium is transfered from the tank to the wet/dry or sump by way of gravity. There is a pump in the sump/wet/dry that returns the water to the tank. The water "overflows" by virtue of the tank being filled by the pump. There will be a continous flow of water from the tank to the wet/dry and back to the tank.

What type of lighting do the trophs need and like?

Lighting is for our eyes and in some cases for the growth of algae. The fish themselves would be fine with ambient light. You can go with almost any kind of lighting, from cheap fluorescent strip lighting to metal halide lights intended for reefs. Typically, the better lighting, the more you pay.

Sorry for the dumb questions.....they may seem elementary, but since I have had a tank (as a kid) things have progressed a lot

No such thing as a dumb question. Every one has to start somewhere and you've asked some very good questions. I'm impressed.


Thanks for any help ahead of time

You're welcome!

MIKE[/b]
[/b][/quote]


Thanks so much Gerry...

Any way you can list your setup or take a picture of the equipment in your cabinet?

If the water is not being drawn from a drilled hole in teh tank does it just come from a hanging tube into the tank?

What other type of filters besides the wet/dry would you recommend in combination?

Again....
Thanks for the great help.

MIKE
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  #10  
Old 01-30-2008
Gerry
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Spartan @ Jan 30 2008, 06:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Quote:
Thanks so much Gerry...

Any way you can list your setup or take a picture of the equipment in your cabinet?

I'll see what I can do. I'm not very good with a camera.

If the water is not being drawn from a drilled hole in teh tank does it just come from a hanging tube into the tank?

A hob overflow is typically a 2 chamber device constructed of acrylic and hangs on the frame of the tank. One chamber in the tank and one outside the tank. The chamber outside the tank is typically deeper than the one in the tank and is connected to the wet/dry with a hose or even pvc piping. The 2 chambers are connected by u-tubes and once primed they work on their own by virtue of gravity as long as there is enough water in the tank to continue.

What other type of filters besides the wet/dry would you recommend in combination?

I like the 405 and I would combine it with either another canister or an hob filter like the Aquaclears. Either the 300 or the 500 would be a good match to the fluval. It's my opinion tha the Aquaclears provide the best bang for your dollar. HOB filters tend to produce a bit of a waterrfall sound and are not as quiet as canisters, but are great performers. It really depends on your budget.

Again....
Thanks for the great help.
'
No problem.

MIKE[/b]
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