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Tropheus Disease, Health and Nutrition Discussion of Tropheus diseases, general health, nutrition and water conditions.

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  #41  
Old 12-18-2014
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I'll try an answer to the original question: "I am wondering if it might be better to keep the hardness lower for moorii or not."
Maintaining color pattern in fish is a neuroendocrine mechanism controlled. The color change is also the first symptom of a disease. Fish do not "consume" extra energy trying to maintain the typical color.
So, keeping proper and characteristic hardness of the lake in our tanks is necessary only for wild, and recently caught fish, which are in the process of adaptation or acclimation to artificial conditions.
Fish will adapt over time to the hardness of tap water...and I don't think that the hardness exerts a significant influence upon the body color after several years of stocking.
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Old 12-18-2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishdisease View Post
I'll try an answer to the original question: "I am wondering if it might be better to keep the hardness lower for moorii or not."
Maintaining color pattern in fish is a neuroendocrine mechanism controlled. The color change is also the first symptom of a disease. Fish do not "consume" extra energy trying to maintain the typical color.
So, keeping proper and characteristic hardness of the lake in our tanks is necessary only for wild, and recently caught fish, which are in the process of adaptation or acclimation to artificial conditions.
Fish will adapt over time to the hardness of tap water...and I don't think that the hardness exerts a significant influence upon the body color after several years of stocking.

Looking more into this I think that there are more factors than I originally thought. Things that are more based around proper biological functions, such as efficiencies of the liver, kidney's and digestive tract mainly. Reason being is that al of these will affect the overall health of the fish in the long run.

The Colors of the fish are controller by numerous things from the neurological system to the capabilities of the fish's ability of the intestines to absorb vitamins and minerals properly.

So for instance, if the fish is exposed to foods that it's digestive tract isn't supposed to be exposed to or at least not for very long, this can cause issues that can cause inflammation or scarring in the intestines and ultimately the inability to absorb ample amounts of vitamins/ minerals that in turn can cause the inability to hold proper functioning of the organs...

Basically the same thing as humans not eating the right foods for a long time can end up with poor biological functions that can cause malnutrition and eventually lead to other health problems that escalate the decrease in health with age.

This is one of the reasons that the elderly will typically hit a tipping point with health as the human body will stop making specific enzyme in the digestive tract and if not compensated for, their health depreciates rather quickly for lack of proper nutrition no matter how many vitamins the take. If the body can break them down and absorb them properly, they are being passed right through.

So I'm now thinking more about a holistic approach through vitamin supplements for my fish although I haven't decided on any as of yet. I think that we as fish keepers often times don't think enough about the health of these fish and think that if they die, they must have had an unpreventable reason. Age is one thing yes but even that can be sustained for a longer period if proper care is implemented.

But then there are things such as certain chemicals like fluoride that are not easily removable from city tap water and can cause issues over time as that chemical builds up within the bodies of the fish. These are all things to consider for extreme longevity if people care to do so. How much longer will this extend the life of a group of fish is unknown... But definitely well worth the investigation...
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  #43  
Old 12-20-2014
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This is a great topic and something I have been considering at times. My personal experience was with Pemba colony which I had for about 10 years. They had no problem spawning but, there were times I wondered if they were showing best color. With this colony I used baking soda to up PH from 7 to 8.3 nothing else.
With my new Brichardi Ulwile I have added Seachem salt to the mix and they are doing great. The only thing I can say to this is that I do have one pemba(from original colony) in the tank with the Brichardi so if I use him for a comparison between no salt and salt I would say the pemba is pretty much the same regardless.

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Old 12-20-2014
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I find this interesting and I have naturally hard water. Ph runs close to 8. My basic GH and KH tests show my GH is close to 180 and KH about 120. Anyone done any more testing on coloration within different hardness levels?
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