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  #1  
Old 05-26-2010
stan1979
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hi folks,

my name is andrew from ireland and have been been involved in fish keeping for the last 15 or so years. i used to keep the joe soap community planted tanks for about ten years then deceided to move onto malawis around five years ago
im now at the stage where im becoming bored of the malawis and have decided to make the change to tangs. i have done some research on what i want but one thing is for sure a large shoal of tropheus is a must for me. im not 100% on what varietys of tropheus are available in ireland so im happy enough to just keep the more common tropheus for the moment.

the tank i have is roughly 5ft long and holds 400 ltrs. im hoping to get my hands on some large river rocks and use play sand as a substrate. the plan is to build up rocks in both corners of the tank with possibly a large flatish stone in the centre and maybe have some vallis scattered around the tank.

the fish im thinking of stocking are
tropheus ikolas or dubosi, maybe 20 of whichever i can get
cyprichromis leptosma x10
neolamprologus leleupi x ???
lamprichthys tanganicanusX???
and possibly some goby cichlids or julidochromis marieri.

any advise or tips on this selection would be greatly appreciated,

looking forward to hearing back from the experts


stan

just in case anyone is interested here is some pics of my tank as it is
http://s197.photobucket.com/albums/a...1979/?start=60


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  #2  
Old 05-26-2010
cichlidomaha
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Andrew: If you definately want a group of Tropheus, I would stay away from everything else you mentioned with the exception of the Gobies which have the same diet requirements as the Trophs. The other fish do not, they need more meaty based protien type foods, which is very bad for the trophs. Too much protien in their diet can cause bloat in the fish. You can add Other Fish such as Petrochromis species if you want some of the petros get very large, but can be housed with trophs because they have the same diet requirements and get along fairly well together.Although if you want to keep Petros with Trophs I would go with a 6 ft tank Minimum. I hope this info. is helpful to you.
Tom

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(stan1979 @ May 26 2010, 05:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Quote:
hi folks,

my name is andrew from ireland and have been been involved in fish keeping for the last 15 or so years. i used to keep the joe soap community planted tanks for about ten years then deceided to move onto malawis around five years ago
im now at the stage where im becoming bored of the malawis and have decided to make the change to tangs. i have done some research on what i want but one thing is for sure a large shoal of tropheus is a must for me. im not 100% on what varietys of tropheus are available in ireland so im happy enough to just keep the more common tropheus for the moment.

the tank i have is roughly 5ft long and holds 400 ltrs. im hoping to get my hands on some large river rocks and use play sand as a substrate. the plan is to build up rocks in both corners of the tank with possibly a large flatish stone in the centre and maybe have some vallis scattered around the tank.

the fish im thinking of stocking are
tropheus ikolas or dubosi, maybe 20 of whichever i can get
cyprichromis leptosma x10
neolamprologus leleupi x ???
lamprichthys tanganicanusX???
and possibly some goby cichlids or julidochromis marieri.

any advise or tips on this selection would be greatly appreciated,

looking forward to hearing back from the experts


stan

just in case anyone is interested here is some pics of my tank as it is
http://s197.photobucket.com/albums/a...1979/?start=60[/b]
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  #3  
Old 05-26-2010
billansor
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Hi Andrew...

Your going to have fun with this new direction that your going in... The Ikola's are (my personal favorite) a beautiful fish and you will be pleased... You have an excellent tank size.... the length is wonderful!!

The Gobies would be ideal to have... While the others are very doable in terms of most things in a much bigger tank, in your size tank, they may have some aggression issues over time and for the beginning, I would stay with the basics until your really comfortable...

Just my thoughts..

Again.... Have a wonderful stay with us... Ask lots of questions and you will ever be disappointed in learning.

Bill
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Old 05-26-2010
Heather
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Welcome to Trophs.com Andrew

Some good advice above
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Old 05-26-2010
Fish Geek
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Andrew,
Welcome!!
In my experience, Lelupi's are very territorial while spawning and tending their young and since they are so prolific, that translates into almost constant aggression towards the other tank denizens.
I've kept shellies, Julidochromis (marlieri and ornatus), Chalinochromis, Steatocranus, Eretmodus and ngara with my groups and while they all were basically fine, the Shellies, Julies and Erets did the best. Steato's eat fry, ngara are a bit too mellow and the dominant male musanga wouldn't allow him to spawn with his females. The Chal was too young for me to make a fair assesment on. Erets can eat fry, too. Heck, they all can but some species are a shoe-in for that behavior.
The Trophs will keep you captivated anyway...
I agree with the sage words of Bill: your tank is ideal for a nice group of Trophs!!!
Can't wait to see what you come up with.
Again, welcome.
Jenney.
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Old 05-26-2010
geost
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Some great advice above. Provided there are a lot of rockwork and free swiming space the species you outlined can work but breeding of any of them would likely slow or not occur at all. If breeding is your goal keep 1 type of trophs, cyps and gobys; 2 of the 3 types should be able to breed. This of course depends on your confidence level and time for you to observe and deal with issues.

Remember to quarantine all new fish for a few weeks prior to introduction into your main tank. Have fun with it and welcome aboard Andrew.
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Old 05-27-2010
billansor
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The following quote from George cannot be emphasized enough!!

Remember to quarantine all new fish for a few weeks prior to introduction into your main tank. Have fun with it and welcome aboard Andrew.


So many many of our members on here have learned this lesson so harshly and hard...

Do make sure that you have a good quarantine tank setup once your initial fish are in place.... You will never have regrets if you do. Quarantining your fish for at least a month will keep many nightmares aware...

Bill
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Old 05-27-2010
tony111
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Hi Andrew,

I have leleupi in with my trophs and its working very well. I never intended it to be more than a very temporary arrangement. The plan was to house my 18 newly bought trophs in with an adult pair and half a dozen juvenile leleupi and a few juvenile neolamprologus brichardi in a 100cm 50 gal tank while I got on with setting up a new home for the trophs. Well it's three months later and that's still the plan! Meanwhile the trophs have started breeding (I didn't think they or the tank were big enough but they've surprised me) and the leleupi still go through their frequent breeding cycles.

You hear a lot of tales concerning the aggression of leleupi. I don't want to cast doubt on those accounts, but I would say individual experiences may vary. In my case the leleupi show no aggression except to other leleupi. In both the current arrangement and previously, when they were part of a mixed lamprologine set up, they were peaceful even when spawning, and never menaced adults or fry of other species. As far as food goes its geared entirely to suit the trophs and the leleupi have just had to learn to love it. They may dream of the days when there was all the frozen brine shrimp in the world but they look to be doing well on herbivore flakes and pellets. They even eat small bits of nori seaweed.

No doubt other keepers will have had very different experiences with leleupi, but this has been mine.

Good luck (and greetings from London) Tony
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